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Treating systemic antibiotic-resistant infections 
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Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2011 11:58 am
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Post Treating systemic antibiotic-resistant infections
Preamble: I know you can't and don't intend to diagnose or treat illness per FDA regs.
That said, I'm seeking advice on how to work within the allopathic (hospital) medical community to encourage the use of Benchmark Thyme and/or other oils/blends that are known to work in cases of MRSA and other antibiotic resistant agents of infection. In this case, I don't know which medical professional would know how to correctly use EO/Aromatherapy to intervene in a case of systemic infection where antibiotics clearly aren't working anymore.

My sister is developmentally disabled and has been living in an institution for years. Because residents of this type of system end up with many urinary tract infections, they are known to be on prophylactic doses of antibiotics - sometimes for years at a time. Naturally, when infection crops up, it can be very difficult to control. My sister has been hospitalized for several weeks, on very high doses of strong antibiotics that are not stopping her infection (UTI), which started with a kidney stone. My mother is the guardian and tries to work with Doctors to ensure consistent care, but together we do not know whom to contact or how to discuss with them the very real possibility that Aromatherapy might have an answer - at least for controlling the infection.

I am looking to this community for ideas on how we might work with doctors, nurses, or professionals outside the hospital to begin to include topical or diffused oils in a medical regimen to control infection and support healing. FYI, this is taking place in the Cleveland, Ohio area, in case anyone has access to contacts there.


Mon Nov 07, 2011 1:03 pm
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Joined: Thu Jul 07, 2011 10:51 pm
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Post Re: Treating systemic antibiotic-resistant infections
There's a book available on the site called 'Aromatherapy vs. MRSA' here http://www.anandaapothecary.com/aromath ... books.html

This would be a good thing to try to get health professionals to read. An idea for starters.

Cheers,
Eric


Wed Nov 09, 2011 8:30 am
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Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2011 11:58 am
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Post Re: Treating systemic antibiotic-resistant infections
Thanks, Eric - I will check out the book and see where it goes from there...
best,
Lorah


Thu Nov 10, 2011 9:30 am
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Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2011 2:52 pm
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Post Re: Treating systemic antibiotic-resistant infections
hi Lorah--
I don't have any info for you but am wondering what MRSA is. I've got some health issues involving various antibiotic resistant bugs and am also looking into this area.
alliswell


Thu Nov 10, 2011 11:46 pm
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Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2011 12:32 pm
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Post Re: Treating systemic antibiotic-resistant infections
Hi Alliswell.

MRSA stands for Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Here is some information from Wikipedia:

"Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterium responsible for several difficult-to-treat infections in humans. It is also called multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ORSA).
MRSA is any strain of Staphylococcus aureus that has developed resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, which include the penicillins (methicillin, dicloxacillin, nafcillin, oxacillin, etc.) and the cephalosporins. The development of such resistance does not cause the organism to be more intrinsically virulent than strains of Staphylococcus aureus that have no antibiotic resistance, but resistance does make MRSA infection more difficult to treat with standard types of antibiotics and thus more dangerous.
MRSA is especially troublesome in hospitals and nursing homes, where patients with open wounds, invasive devices, and weakened immune systems are at greater risk of infection than the general public.

Signs and symptoms

S. aureus most commonly colonizes the anterior nares (the nostrils). The rest of the respiratory tract, open wounds, intravenous catheters, and the urinary tract are also potential sites for infection. Healthy individuals may carry MRSA asymptomatically for periods ranging from a few weeks to many years. Patients with compromised immune systems are at a significantly greater risk of symptomatic secondary infection.
In most patients, MRSA can be detected by swabbing the nostrils and isolating the bacteria found inside. Combined with extra sanitary measures for those in contact with infected patients, screening patients admitted to hospitals has been found to be effective in minimizing the spread of MRSA in hospitals in the United States,[1] Denmark, Finland, and the Netherlands. [2] MRSA may progress substantially within 24–48 hours of initial topical symptoms. After 72 hours, MRSA can take hold in human tissues and eventually become resistant to treatment. The initial presentation of MRSA is small red bumps that resemble pimples, spider bites, or boils; they may be accompanied by fever and, occasionally, rashes. Within a few days, the bumps become larger and more painful; they eventually open into deep, pus-filled boils.[3] About 75 percent of community-associated (CA-) MRSA infections are localized to skin and soft tissue and usually can be treated effectively. But some CA-MRSA strains display enhanced virulence, spreading more rapidly and causing illness much more severe than traditional healthcare-associated (HA-) MRSA infections, and they can affect vital organs and lead to widespread infection (sepsis), toxic shock syndrome, and necrotizing ("flesh-eating") pneumonia. This is thought to be due to toxins carried by CA-MRSA strains, such as PVL and PSM, though PVL was recently found to not be a factor in a study by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the NIH. It is not known why some healthy people develop CA-MRSA skin infections that are treatable while others infected with the same strain develop severe infections or die. [4]The most common manifestations of CA-MRSA are skin infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis and pyomyositis (most commonly found in the tropics), necrotizing pneumonia, infective endocarditis (which affects the valves of the heart), and bone and joint infections.[5] CA-MRSA often results in abscess formation that requires incision and drainage. Before the spread of MRSA into the community, abscesses were not considered contagious, because it was assumed that infection required violation of skin integrity and the introduction of staphylococci from normal skin colonization. However, newly emerging CA-MRSA is transmissible (similar, but with very important differences) from Hospital-Associated MRSA. CA-MRSA is less likely than other forms of MRSA to cause cellulitis.
"

The main reason that so many "Anti-biotic Resistant" strains of bacteria have developed is due the widespread OVERUSE of antibiotics. Essential Oils (i.e. Melissa Officianalis) have been proven to heal these resistant strains without inducing further "drug resistance".

You have my best wishes in resolving your various health issues. Trying to find some natural solutions to balance and blend with the conventional medical treatment you are receiving, is definitely your best chance for improving your health.

All The Best,

Sue


Fri Nov 11, 2011 10:42 am
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Joined: Thu Dec 08, 2011 9:30 pm
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Post Re: Treating systemic antibiotic-resistant infections
Is tea tree oil safe for ingesting??


Thu Dec 08, 2011 9:47 pm
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Joined: Thu Jul 07, 2011 10:51 pm
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Post Re: Treating systemic antibiotic-resistant infections
Tea tree is safe for ingesting in small amounts for the course of the condition being treated. IMHO the best of the antimicrobial oils is actually Benchmark Thyme, which chemically is a combination of Tea Tree and Thyme essential oils together. Tea tree is somewhat 'old school' these days.

All the Best,
Eric


Thu Dec 15, 2011 7:57 pm
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Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2011 12:19 pm
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Post Re: Treating systemic antibiotic-resistant infections
Well I'm hoping it's not too "old school" because I'm trying it along with Oil of Oregano in an attempt to cure nail problems...

Interesting about the MRSA...


Sun Dec 18, 2011 7:34 pm
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Joined: Thu Jul 07, 2011 10:51 pm
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Post Re: Treating systemic antibiotic-resistant infections
See 'Aromatherapy Vs MRSA' on this page http://www.anandaapothecary.com/aromatherapy-essential-oil-books.html

'Benchmark' Thyme is really the new standard for antimicrobial oils. Oregano is really just too tricky to use, as it's so easy to burn the skin with.

Best,
Eric


Sun Dec 18, 2011 7:39 pm
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Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2011 12:19 pm
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Post Re: Treating systemic antibiotic-resistant infections
Thanks Eric...here's how we mixed it...2 ml. of oregano and 54 drops of tea tree oil...will I go up in flames?...(just kidding)...hoping this helps and doesn't burn...what do you think?


Sun Dec 18, 2011 8:18 pm
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Post Re: Treating systemic antibiotic-resistant infections
Hi NaturalRain,

I STILL recommend Benchmark Thyme EO for MRSA. It's been the only essential oil shown to have a positive effect on the bacterial infection. Oregao has been tested, but without much success. The trouble with oregano is that it will burn healthy cells all too easily, especially when trying to be aggressive about MRSA. Benchmark Tyme ALSO has 1,4 terpiniol as does tea tree - thought to be TTO's active ingredient - in significant amounts. There's a book on our site called 'aromatherapy and mrsa' explaining this.


Wed Aug 29, 2012 10:20 pm
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