Five Carrier Oils for Beauty ~ #1 is Tamanu

 

Tamanu Nuts on Tree
Tamanu nuts from which this great oil is pressed.

We’ve  decided to list and explain our 5 favorite carrier oils for skin care blends in one blog post (but it turned out to be too long for the in-depth learning our customers deserve, so we’ve separated it into a post for each wonderfully therapeutic oil).

We’ve also included several blends at the bottom of each post for you to experiment with! Check out the recipes at the bottom!

The best of the skin care carrier oils will each have several therapeutic properties, and of course the best ones have the most of these types of properties, while being well-tolerated by most skin types. So here it goes! The BIG list!

Tamanu Oil is “great skin care oil number one”. Also called “Foraha”, or by its botanical name: Callophyllum inophylllum, it is pressed from the Tamanu tree nut, with our organic oil originating in Morocco. Before pressing, the nuts are dried for two months in the sun to vastly improve the therapeutic qualities before cold-pressed oil. Tamanu (botanical name: Callophyllum inophylllum) is considered on of the most profoundly healing of the carriers for the skin (there are a few vying it out for this top position).  It is noted by Dr. Kurt Schnaubelt in Advanced Aromatherapy to be an important wound healer. Tamanu is THE premier carrier oil for healing scars and stretch marks (and is incredibly safe!).

Tamanu nut oil is included in every one of his wound healing and scar reduction recipes at about a 20% concentration of the total base, though can be used at 100% without a problem — you just might to want some therapeutic properties of other carrier oils in your formula as well!. Tamanu oil promotes new tissue formation, accelerating healing and healthy skin growth, which can be thought of as a natural form of Retin-A. It will promote the growth of healthy new skin cells — a process which slows as we get older, and is partially responsible for the aging of our skin.

Tamanu Oil

Pure Organic Tamanu Oil

As noted by mountianroseherbs.com: Tamanu oil fades stretch marks with incredible results. It also works miracles on scar tissue, making scars look less unsightly. BioScience Laboratories noted there was significant improvement in appearance of scars after six weeks, and improvement continued through week nine. Scar length was reduced by an average 0.28 centimeters, and width was reduced by an average 0.12 centimeters!

Tamanu oil possesses a unique capacity to promote the formation of new tissue, thereby accelerating wound healing and the growth of healthy skin—a process known as cicatrization. For this reason, it is a widely used, traditional topical aid. In Pacific island folk medicine, tamanu oil is applied liberally to  cuts; scrapes; burns; insect bites and stings; abrasions; acne and acne scars; psoriasis; diabetic sores; anal fissures; sunburn; dry or scaly skin; blisters, eczema, herpes sores; and is used to reduce foot and body odor.

Its interesting to note that oils that help with scars will typically help reduce the appearance of wrinkles, and for this, we’ve included it in our Super Skin Care Base – a formula with several carriers to you don’t need to buy each one separately to make a great recipe!

And what may be yet undiscovered is its ability to regrow thinning hair. Emu oil, derived from glands of the bird, has a strong anti-inflammation action that is believed to be the source of Emu oil’s exceptional ability to regrow hair. Emu oil blended with virgin coconut may be even more potent. Now this is just theory of course, but if tamanu is such a great wound healer, as a potent anti-inflammatory agent, doesn’t it seem to stand that it may have the same effects? Some of us at Ananda are giving it a whorl, seeing what the daily scalp massage of tamanu and virgin coconut oil will be.

Tamanu oil is known to have potent antimicrobial properties, being antibacterial and anti-fungal, historically and successfully being used to treat every infectious skin disease. It was used by Tahitians to treat fungal infections (like athlete’s foot), plus acne and acne scars, psoriasis, diabetic sores, anal fissures, sunburn, dry or scaly skin, blisters, eczema, diaper rash and herpes sores–and even to reduce foot and body odor

In Europe, sometimes called “Domba oil”  (this oil has more names than any other we know of !!! :)  … it has a 70 to 75 percent success rate in alleviating rheumatism and scabies. It’s also effective on gout and ringworm. It can be applied to mucous membrane lesions.  It heals chapped skin, post-surgical wounds, skin allergies, cracked skin, bed sores, wounds, rashes, abrasions, athlete’s foot, boils, and infected nails.Tamanu oil has even healed severe burns caused by boiling water, chemicals and X-rays.  Its anti-inflammatory properties reduce rashes, sores, swelling and abrasions. Tamanu oil also reputedly relieves a sore throat when it is applied to the neck.

FURTHER, it is also used as an analgesic my its original users, using it as a massage oil to help with neuralgia, sore joints, aches and pains of all sorts, and would make a great combination with Helichrysum or Lavender essential oils. We highly recommend including Tamanu oil  in your bases for pain relief and injury healing formulas. Both the pain and wound healing activity is likely due to it’s significant anti-inflammatory activity due in part from a  molecule  called Phenyl Coumarin Calophyllolide and various xanthones in the oil.

Recall that is Coumarin compounds that are found both in Helichrysum and Turmeric essential oils that are anti-inflammatory (and thus pain reieving), but can have the tendency to be an anticoagulant. Those using blood thinning medications should check with their doctor before bating themselves in the oil :) !!!

The only feature of this oil that some don’t care for is it’s thick, green/color, and somewhat earthy aroma. It’s really not strong – unless you are very sensitive (I use it often as a face moisturizer at 100% strength), but with the addition of other carriers and essential oils – it can work wonders. All in all, one of the best skin healing carrier oils available!

A great many therapists suggest using with Ravensara essential oil at a 50:50 ratio for an anti-viral, soothing blend for shingles. This is an absolutely wonderful oil, that works especially well when blended with other carrier oils for your skin care recipes.

Recipes

For general scar reduction, of both old and new scars — the only difference being that older scars may take longer to show improvement. And, unlike recipes including Recipes including Rosehip Seed, this CAN be used where acne breakouts may still occur.

For 1 ounce or 30ml of blend, use a base of 1/3 Tamanu Nut, and 2/3 Hazelnut. To this, add the following:
.5ml (17 drops) Helichrysum Italicum
.5ml (17 drops) Lavender Vera
.5ml (17 drops) Rosemary c,t, Verbenone (a special tyoe of rosemary for skin healing)

For General Antioxidant and Rejuvenation Beauty Care – which you may want to use at night as it may leave your face slightly red for a little while after application.

For 1 ounce or 30ml of blend, use a base of 1/3 Tamanu Nut, 1/3rd Argan Nut and 1/3rd Rosehip seed. To this, add the following:
.25ml (8 drops) Helichrysum Italicum
1ml (26 drops) Sea Buckthorn CO2
.25ml (8 drops) Frankincense (blend of both CO2 types)
.25ml (8 drops) Rosemary c,t, Verbenone AND if you’d like the special aroma and and properties of Rose, include 6 drops of Rose Otto.

So there you have it — oil #1 of our top 5 skin care carrier oils, all of which will be reviewed in the following days, with recipes and usage suggestions. Enjoy!

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One Response to Five Carrier Oils for Beauty ~ #1 is Tamanu

  1. charlotte b. hansen says:

    Am glad to have found Ananda essential oils, there is no other in this country.
    Only Shirley Price in the UK has the quality of true essential oils, but she no longer sells in this country.

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