There’s A Eucalyptus Oil Everyone Will Like!

Eucalyptus Citradora Leaves

Eucalyptus Citradora Leaves

Eucalyptus essential oils have been among the most popular both in Aromatherapy as well as ingredients in pharmaceutical preparations primarily for relief of congestion and cold symptoms. But they do so much more! And that’s why Ananda just added 3 “new” types, for a total of 5. There’s sure to be one you’ll like! Here’s a little list of what we’ve got…(and if you’re interested, you can try a pack of all 5 in 5ml, 12ml or 30ml sizes here!)

Blue Gum Eucalyptus – Also called “Eucalyptus Globulus”, it’s probably the most commonly used variety, and what you’ll likely get if you just ask for Eucalyptus Oil. It is often manipulated to increase the cineol content and remove all other aroma. But why? It’s already at 80%, and we REALLY like the aroma. Usually from Australia or South Africa, ours is from the French island of Corsica – Where many of the world’s finest essential oils are grown and distilled. Ours is really lively and fresh. Primary uses are (as they are for most Eucalyptus oils) relief from cold symptoms and congestion, and relief from pain and stiffness in massage formulas. The oils are often included in   “pre-event” massage blends to get the circulation going.

Eucalyptus Dives Essential Oil

Eucalyptus Dives Essential Oil

Eucalyptus Dives – The aroma has a lovely “woody” tone with a light peppermint note (also sometimes called “Peppermint Eucalyptus”, and in general this is considered one of the two most “mild” Eucalyptus varieties for application to the skin. It has a lower cineol content (about 60-70%, which is certainly still highly therapeutic) but the overall chemistry makes for a more gentle acting oil on the skin and mucous membranes.

Eucalyptus Citradora, or "Lemon Eucalyptus" Oil

Eucalyptus Citradora, or "Lemon Eucalyptus" Oil

Eucalyptus Citradora (Lemon Eucalyptus) – This Eucalyptus oil has the highest content of citronellal of any variety, giving it a pleasing lemony scent. It’s often used in place of citronella in insect repellent formulas where someone may prefer the aroma more. Like other Eucalyptus varieties, it is also an antimicrobial, and can be used in a diffuser to both support breathing conditions as well as keep bugs out of a space.

Eucalyptus Radiata – The second most popular Eucalyptus oil (also known as Narrow Leaf Eucalyptus), and probably the number one oil for most folks for cold-care. It was with Eucalyptus Radiata that researchers at the Institute of Neurobiology and Molecular Medicine in Rome, Italy, produced their study called “Stimulatory effect of Eucalyptus  essential oil on innate cell-mediated immune response.” (Published in BMC Immunology, 2008 Apr 18;9:17). It appears Eucalyptus actually boosts the activity of our immune system, such that the phyagocytotic action is increased. (That’s when immune system cells devour pathogens and remove them from our bodies). Eucalyptus Radiata is often mentioned as the most potent anti-viral Eucalyptus, though they are all antibacterial, anti-fungal, and act as mucolytics (loosening congestion). The aroma is very clean – almost what we would say was a “straightforward, bright, clean, Eucalyptus”

Eucalyptus Smithii Essential Oil

Eucalyptus Smithii Essential Oil

Eucalyptus Smithii – With a very pleasant, woody and earthy scent, Eucalyptus smithii is considered the most mild in effect on the skin and mucous membranes, but not in therapeutics. It’s called for for long term use, for children, elderly, an anyone who might be generally sensitive. It has a great fresh scent that we here at Ananda really appreciate. It’s certainly an oil to experiment with, perhaps if you’ve found some of the more common varieties to have aromas that are a little too bright. We really like this one!

 

 

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